Dream Over

An Introduction to ‘Dream Over, America’

Posted in Dream Over, America by sensairandom on March 1, 2010

For people immersed in the study of any of the crises that afflict our planet, it becomes abundantly obvious that we are doomed. Politics, finance, energy, education, health care, and most importantly the ecosystem are headed toward near-certain collapse…

–Charles Eisenstein, The Ascent of Humanity

Since collapse is unavoidable, the obvious fall-back strategy would be to invest in local resiliency and self-sufficiency. Since neither government appears the least bit interested in such matters, it is time for us to recognize them for what they are to us: utterly irrelevant. Paying attention to national politics can only distract us from doing whatever we can as individuals and local communities.

-Dmitry Orlov, Collapse Gap Revisited

Whatever else one thinks of how we live these days, it’s hard to not see it as temporary, historically anomalous, a peculiar blip in human experience. I’ve spent my whole life riding around in cars, never questioning whether the makings of tomorrow’s supper would be there waiting on the supermarket shelves, never doubting when I entered a room that the lights would go on at the flick of a switch, never worrying about my personal safety. And now hardly a moment goes by when I don’t feel tremors of massive change in these things, as though all life’s comforts and structural certainties rested on a groaning fault line.

-JHK, Clusterfuck Nation

In effect, we have to create a desirable “new normal” that  fits the constraints imposed by depleting natural  resources. Maintaining the “old normal” is not an option;  if we do not find new goals for ourselves and plan our  transition from a growth-based economy to a healthy  equilibrium economy, we will by default create a much less  desirable “new normal” whose emergence we are already  beginning to see in the forms of persistent high  unemployment, a widening gap between rich and poor, and  ever more frequent and worsening financial and  environmental crises—all of which translate to profound  distress for individuals, families, and communities.

-Richard Heinberg, Life After Growth

“Since collapse is unavoidable, the obvious fall-back strategy would be to invest in local resiliency and self-sufficiency. Since neither government appears the least bit interested in such matters, it is time for us to recognize them for what they are to us: utterly irrelevant. Paying attention to national politics can only distract us from doing whatever we can as individuals and local communities.”

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